Like Holding a Beautiful Girl! 1968 Coral (Danelectro) Hornet Guitar

Right here is my all time favorite guitar to come out of the late 60s MCA Danelectro period!!   All Coral guitars were only made for about two years, and there’s all kinds of people who want to get their hands on any Coral guitar they can find!  This one is in the collection of Dave D’Amelio and I’m hoping if I mention how bad I want this guitar EVERY time I talk to Dave, he’ll let me have it through subliminal messaging.  Yup, I’m addicted.

Some of the Coral guitars were made in Japan (bodies for the hollow bodies), but the solid body Coral guitars were all New Jersey BABY!  Once again we see a Vincent Bell design, and let me tell you something, that guy had some cool ideas.  Holding this guitar is something to experience.  Seriously, all the edges are tapered and smooth and it’s like wrapping your arms around a slender, firm woman.  Does that sound weird?  Anyway, Dave found this in a now defunct music store in Wilkes Barre PA.  It cost $350 in 1992 and was worth every penny I’d say.  Dano Dave even named his first cat after this guitar, “Horny”!!!

The bodies on these Hornets were poplar and they balance very well.  Dimensions were: length 40 3/8″, body 19″ long, 14″ wide, 1 3/4″ deep, 25″ scale, 21 frets. The Coral catalogs at the time described them this way:

Meet the Hornet… favorite of recording artists for the true electric sound.  Handsome sculptured body designed for perfect balance.  Detailed with custom features for fast action and complete flexibility. The price of these fine instruments will surprise the most critical artist.  Available in Pearlescent Black, Flame Red, Three Color, and Natural Sunburst…pickup with and without vibrato.

Prices and models are as follows:

  • H2N5-Double pickup with individual volume controls plus master volume control.  Four switches provide complete tone variations for highs, lows, and mid range effects.  $138
  • H2V6- Same as H2N6 with vibrato. $149
  • H3N6- Triple pickup with individual volume controls plus master volume control, switches for each pickup. $159
  • F3V6- Same as H3N6 with vibrato arm. $169

There was also a Scorpion model as a twelve string.  The S2N12 Scorpion was the two pickup version and cost $149, and the S3N12 had three pickups and cost $169.

Looking at the back of the guitar you can see that signature neck joint used on the Corals. Very interesting.  These Hornets all had the neck tilt feature and tend to set up very well.  Remember, the Coral line was supposed to be the “professional” line of Danelectro.  At least that’s what MCA envisioned.  But these guitars were made very well and used some really good components.  The finish, tuners, body sculpting and overall fit and finish are top notch.  One part I don’t like about these Hornets is the tone switching.  Whenever I see words like tone “shading” or tone “presets” I sort of cringe.  What those terms usually mean is that there is a lot of wiring and capacitors between you and the pure singing tone of the guitar.  In the case of these Hornet guitars, this is sorta true.

When Dano got this guitar all the wiring had already been messed with so he just took what was left and wired it straight from pickups to pots.  Both he and I would love to see a wiring diagram of the original scheme, so if anyone out there has one, well, you know what to do.  I think the sound of these Hornets is just the balls.  These came with bigger frets, a flat radius, and of course that sculpted body.  Check out the pic below to get an idea how the entire body is tapered at the ends!

Can you see that!?!?!  I remember some Ibanez guitars of the 80s hyped their sculpted design, but let me tell you that was a sad effort compared with the Hornet.  Good grief man, these guitars just melt into your body.  Can you tell I love them?  Doing a quick Google search leads to Pete Townshend, who used these for a few years, and of course Dan Auerbach was seen recently playing one of these in January 2012.  Dan is becoming a one man live guitar museum!

So peeps, there it is.  The Danelectro company was just one of the best makers of guitars there ever was.  The humble masonite and pine bodies reached the final evolution with these Hornet solidbodies, and the lipstick pickups paired with the solid wood just created a wonderful marriage.  So check out Mike Dugan caressing the lady…

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Electric Toad Engineering Bomber Boxx Germanium Fuzz!!!

Aside

Right here is a really awesome, affordable, fuzz box made by one guy in the USA.  Up in Maine to be exact!  This is an all germanium fuzz creature with a cool “choke” switch that cuts the sustain and noise between notes. This pedal sounds HUGE and THICK, which are total musts when describing any good fuzz box in my world. Very cool.  This is one of my favorite fuzz boxes currently being made.  Check this guy out.  His name is Sean Carter and I love his work!  Here’s his site, and here’s a demo of his Bomber Boxx!  Mike Dugan demoed this pedal using my Fender Jaguar Special (older Japanese model with hum buckers) and the trusty ‘ol Ampeg Gemini I.  Enjoy!

1960s Japanese Guitar Brand Name Game!!

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OK, I think it’s time for a list like this.  Way back in the 1995 the early legend of guitar research, Michael Wright, published a short list like this in his book Guitar Stories Volume One. What he did was compile a list of brand names and distributors/importers where known.  At the end of his list he wrote that it was time to start tracking all the names down but in the almost 20 years that have followed, I haven’t seen anyone else try.  So, I figured I’d give it a shot!  I’m going to try to list every damn brand name that was ever placed on the headstock of a 1960s Japanese guitar!!  A lot of this information is already out there floating around like tiny puzzle pieces, and all I’m trying to do is collect it in one place.

Of course it’s a seemingly impossible task, so I did/do need help.  Many thanks need to go out to the main contributors to this list besides yours truly.  The great Jimmy Noise worked on this list and added a ton of information, and Nate DeMont of DeMont Guitars gave up just about everything he had for this project.  Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music filled in some missing pieces too.  These three guys are just so great for sharing what they know.  One thing I learned from this project is that some dudes are holding on to their information for various odd reasons and really don’t want to give it up.  So I really appreiate these fellers!  As of late, the great Bill Menting has been filling in some of the missing information, and again, I appreciate it!  Thanks Bill!

Also, a million thanks goes to the excellent work of Michael Wright, who was writing and researching these guitars when people were just as likely to throw them in the trash.  I also want to mention the great site Jedistar.  That fellow has done some really excellent work compiling all sorts of information regarding guitar brands from all over the world, both past and present.

Now before all you curmudgeons and codgers start blasting away at the information compiled here, I want you to stop and think about my mission for a moment.  This is just to help people out, so maybe somebody can rediscover the guitar of their youth.  Maybe someone can connect with that eager teenager that wailed away in a garage in the middle of nowhere.  Maybe someone can actually LEARN something about that guitar that’s been sitting in a closet for the past 50 years and maybe that guitar can get fixed up and handed down.  You get my drift? Yeah, I can be idealistic at times, so screw you!  This is not for profit or to raise prices on these Japanese guitars.  A HUGE part of the fun with these 60s MIJ guitars is that they’re still pretty cheap!  And when they aren’t cheap and everyone thinks every old guitar is worth a boatload of money, then I’ll move on and start my beer can collection again.  Yeah, that’s right, beer cans.

As with any good research, primary sources are the best.  But as you can imagine most are just not available, so we’re left to rely on secondary sources, our own eyes, and our failing memories rattling around up there like dried beans. Many people will want to know which factory made their guitar, but that is a truly maddening process because of the way it was back then.  Take for instance the Apollo brand; we know from looking at one Apollo catalog from the 1960s that Apollo guitars were being made by Guyatone, Kawai, and Zenon, all within the same year!!  I’ll be happy if we can figure out the market, the importer/distributor, and maybe even the store where the name originated.

If you see a (?) listed, that means more research or proof is needed.  I’m focusing on 50s and 60s Japanese electrics, but there will be some sneaky 70s names in here, some Korean models, and maybe the odd acoustic brand too.  The 70s Japanese guitars are pretty well documented, especially in comparison with the 60s stuff.  This is a dynamic list, meaning it will be changing over time as more and more information is gathered. Please be aware that I won’t be 100% on the dime with every brand name origin, so with that being said, I’m always open to corrections and suggestions.  Yeah, that’s right.  I’m talking directly to all dudes living in darkened rooms with only the flicker of a computer screen keeping you warm, YEAH YOU!  And anyone else of course…

All right bitches, here’s the LIST!!!!!

  • Abe- known for acoustics
  • Alex-
  • Alfa-Tone-
  • Alvarez- US market, St. Louis Music
  • Amena- 70s copy era
  • Ampeg- Selmer
  • Anboy-
  • Andre-
  • Angelica- UK market, Boosey and Hawkes distributor
  • Anson- 70s copy era, AUS (?)
  • Antares- 70s copy era, imported by Vega Int., California
  • Antoria- UK market, imported by JT Coppock Ltd., Leeds
  • Aokland-
  • Apollo- US market, St. Louis Music Co.
  • Arbiter- UK market
  • Arbor- US market, Musicorp.
  • Arai- see below, early Aria brand name
  • Aria- company and brand, most guitars made by Matsumoku
  • Aria Diamond- see above
  • Ariel-
  • Arirang- 70s copy era
  • Arita- US market, Newark Musical Merchandise Co., NJ
  • Arrow-
  • Artisan- US market, Barth Feinberg, New York
  • Artist-
  • Artist ltd.-
  • Artist Supreme-
  • Asco- German market
  • Aspen- 70s copy era, Musicians Supply Inc., San Diego CA
  • Assama- (?!?!?!?)
  • Astro-
  • Astrotone-
  • Atlas-
  • Audition- UK and US markets, sold at Woolworth/Woolco stores in US(??)
  • Autry-
  • Avalon- US market, Harris/Teller Inc., Chicago
  • Avora-
  • Axiom- AUS market
  • Ayar-
  • Azsama-
  • Aztec- German market, imported by Hopf
  • Bandmaster-
  • Balladeer- US market, Fife and Nichols Store, Hollywood CA
  • Barclay- US market, Unity Buying Service (?)
  • Baron-
  • Barth- US market, mail order catalog
  • Bass Beat-
  • Beam- CAN market (?)
  • Beckenridge-
  • Bedell-
  • BeeTone-
  • Bellwood-
  • Beltone- US market, Monroe Catalog House
  • Bently- 70s copy era, St. Louis Music Supply, Hondo(?)
  • Blackjack- US market, Harris-Fandel Co.
  • Blackstone-
  • Bolero-
  • Bradford- US market, WT Grant Co., Guyatone
  • Bradley- US market, imported by Veneman Music in Maryland
  • Broadway- UK market, website
  • Bruno-
  • Burns-
  • Camaro-
  • Cameo-
  • Canora- N. American market, Great West Imports Ltd.
  • Capri-
  • Carlo Robelli- 70s era Conn and Sam Ash brand
  • Carver-
  • Castilla- 70s copy era, C. Bruno & Sons
  • CBS- 70s copy era
  • Checkmate-
  • Chester-
  • Chimes-
  • Cimar- 70s copy era
  • Cipher- US market, Inter Mark Corp, New York
  • Citation- 70s copy era, US market, Grossman Music, Cleveland
  • Clear Sound-
  • Columbia-
  • Columbus- 70s copy era
  • Commodore-
  • Concert-
  • Condor-
  • Conn- US market, Continental Music Co., Indiana
  • Conqueror- US market, C. Bruno & Son, Matsumoku
  • Conrad- US market, imported by David Wexler and Co., Chicago
  • Continental- US market, Continental Music Co., Chicago
  • Coral- Danelectro MCA era, hollowbody bodies made by Kawai, US made components like electronics and necks
  • Coronado-
  • Coronet- AUS market
  • Cortez- US market, Jack Westheimer Co., Chicago
  • Cortley- CAN market(?), Westheimer Musical Industries, Chicago
  • Crescendo- 70s, early copy era
  • Crestline- 70s copy era, Grossman Music Corp., Ohio
  • Crestwood- US market, La Playa Dist., Detroit
  • Crown-
  • Crown Professional-
  • CSL- UK market, C. Summerfield Ltd.
  • Custom Craft- US market, St. Louis Music Supply
  • Cutler-
  • Cyclone- US market, Leban Imports, Baltimore
  • Daimaru- Daimaru NY Corp., also Japanese factory (?)
  • Daion- 70s quasi-copies, Daion Co. Limited, Japan
  • Dana- CAN market, 70s, ARC Musical Instruments, Ahed Co.
  • Decca- US market, Decca Distributing Corp., New York
  • Del Rey-
  • Delta-
  • Demian- Early Fujigen Gakki brand name.
  • Devoc-
  • Dia-
  • Diamond- US market, Diamond Accordian Co.
  • Diasonic-
  • Discovery-
  • Displender-
  • Dixon-
  • Domino- US market, Maurice Lipsky Music Co., New York
  • Dorado- 70s copy era, distributed by Gretsch
  • Douglas-
  • Duke-
  • Dyko-
  • El Degas- US market, imported by B&G, New York
  • El Maya-
  • Electra- 70s era, St. Louis Music Supply
  • Elger- US market, Elger Co., Ardmore PA
  • Elk- Japan market, quasi-copies
  • Elko-
  • Emperador- US market, imported by Jack Westheimer in Chicago
  • Empires-
  • Empro-
  • Encore- US and UK(?), US Musical Merchandise Corp.
  • Endres-
  • Ensenada- mainly acoustics, Strum & Drum, Chicago
  • Epiphone-
  • Eros- UK market, 70s copy era, Rosetti House of Music, London
  • Espana-
  • Esquire-
  • Essex-
  • Excetero-
  • Exotica-
  • Fandel-
  • Feather-
  • Fell-
  • Fernandes- started as 70s copy era, Saito Musical Instruments
  • Festival-
  • Fiama-
  • Finder-
  • Firstman- Japanese market, factory and brand
  • Franciscan-
  • Fresher- 70s, Kyowa Company Ltd. in Nagoya Japan
  • Fuji-
  • Futurama- mostly made in UK, Italy, Yugoslavia
  • G.H.I- G&H Imports (?), Lodi, NJ
  • G Holiday- US market, Gimble’s Department Store(?)
  • G Maximus-
  • G Rossi-
  • Gaban- Hukuhara Musical Instrument Co.
  • Galaxie-
  • Galaxy-
  • Gallan- 70s era, distributed by Kyowa-Shokai
  • Gigan-
  • Givtone-
  • Global-
  • Goban-
  • Goldentone-
  • Goldmax-
  • Gonzales- 70s era
  • Goya- US market, initially imported by Hershman Musical Instrument Co., NY
  • Granada- CAN market, 70s era, United Conservatory of Music
  • Granson-
  • Grant-
  • Grassi Custom-
  • Greco- made since mid 1960s at Fujigen Gakki factory, Japan, imported by Goya Music Corp., NY
  • Gremlin-
  • Guitarlia-
  • Guya-
  • Guyatone-
  • Halifax-
  • Hariumu/Harimu- 70s era
  • Hawk- (?)
  • Hayakawa- 70s era
  • Heerby-
  • Heit- US market, imported by G&H of Lodi New Jersey
  • Heit Deluxe- Probably same as above
  • Hi-Lo-
  • Hickory-
  • Hohner-
  • Holiday- Alden catalog
  • Holly-
  • Hondo- started 1969, most made in Korea
  • Honey- Japanese brand
  • Horugel-
  • Howard-
  • HsinMi- Dutch market, 70s, mail-order catalog, Taiwan Kawai factory
  • Hylo/Hy-Lo- possible SoCal source??
  • Ibanez- US distributor is Elger Instruments, Hoshino Gakki
  • Ideal-
  • Idol-
  • Imperial- US market, Imperial Accordian Co. of Chicago
  • Isonez-
  • Jamboree- Hoshino Gakki
  • Jason- AUS market, Ibanez/Hoshino Gakki
  • Jedson- UK market, Dallas Musical Electronics Ltd. and Arbiter
  • Johnny Guitar-
  • Kasuga- Factory, and branded guitars appeared in 70s
  • Kawai- Factory and brand name
  • Kay- WMI in Chicago bought Kay name in 68
  • Kaycee- Kansas City Music Dist.
  • Kent- US market, Kent Musical Instrument Co, B&G in New York
  • Key-
  • Kimberly- US market, imported by Limmco, distributed through Lafayette catalog
  • Kingston- US market, imported by Jack Westheimer in Chicago
  • Kinor-
  • Keefy-
  • Knox-
  • Kyowa-
  • Lafayette- US market, Lafayette Radio Electronics catalog, NY
  • Lake-
  • Leban- US market, Leban Imports, Baltimore
  • LaBoz-
  • Lancer-
  • Lero-
  • Liberty- Japanese market
  • Lim-Gar- Could be mis-identified stylized “Z” for Zim Gar, but maybe not
  • Lindberg-
  • Lindell-
  • Lord-
  • Lori-
  • Luxor-
  • Lyle- US market, imported by L.D. Heater in Portland
  • Lynn-
  • Lyra-
  • Maderia- 70s era, Avnet
  • Maestro-
  • Maier-
  • Mann-
  • Marathon-
  • Marco Polo- US market, Harry Stewart
  • Marlin-
  • Marquis-
  • Marvel- US market, Peter Sorkin Music Co., New York
  • Marveltone-
  • Masada- 70s copy era
  • Mason-
  • Matador- 20th Century Music
  • Matao- US market, mostly copy era, West Coast Music Distributors
  • Maximus-
  • Maxitone-
  • Maya- 70s copy era, distributed in UK by Stentor
  • Mayfair- US market, Grossman Music
  • MCM-
  • Medalist-
  • Mello Tone- Name on a very early 50s Teisco guitar
  • Mellowtone-
  • Melodier-
  • Melodies-
  • Melody-
  • Merlin- US market, Lowes store
  • Minister-
  • Monica-
  • Montaya-
  • Montclair-
  • Morales-
  • Morris- Japanese brand, Moridara Co., copy era
  • Naruber-
  • National- Strum & Drum, Chicago
  • Navarra-
  • Nivico- JVC
  • Noble- US market, Don Noble & Co., Chicago
  • Norma- US brand, distributed by Strum ‘N’ Drum, Chicago
  • Norwood-
  • Nuvox- Nuvox Electronics Corp.
  • Omega-
  • Opus- Ampeg/Selmer
  • Orlando-
  • Orpheum- US brand, Maurice Lipsky
  • Orpheus-
  • P. Beuscher-
  • Palmer-
  • Pan-
  • Pearl-
  • Penco- 70s early copy era, Philadelphia Music Co., Limerick PA
  • Penncrest-
  • Philharmonic-
  • Phoenix-
  • Pickwick- Pickwick International Inc.
  • Pleasant- mostly Japanese market
  • Polaris-
  • POS- Believe it or not!!
  • Premier- Sorkin Music Co., New York, Italian and Japanese parts
  • Prestige-
  • Pyramid-
  • Queen-
  • Randel-
  • Raven- N. American market, Great West Imports,
  • Raver-
  • Realistic- US market, Radio Shack, 70s (?)
  • Recco-
  • Regent- US market, K&K Musical Instrument Co.
  • Regina-
  • Rexina-
  • Reythmline- (it’s true!!!)
  • Rhythmline-
  • Riveria-
  • Rodeo
  • Rosetti- UK market, 70s copy era, Rosetti House of Music, London
  • Rossi
  • Royal Artist-
  • Royal Flush-
  • Royalist-
  • Royce-
  • Ryan-
  • Sakai-
  • Sandtron-
  • Satellite-
  • Saturn- US market, Eatons catalogs
  • Schaffer-
  • Sears-
  • Sekova-US market, US Musical Merchandise, New York
  • Sentinal-
  • Seiwa-
  • Shadow-
  • Sigma-
  • Silhousette-
  • Silverstone-
  • Silvertone- US market, Sears Roebuck and Co., Chicago
  • Sonnet- Daimaru Corp., New York
  • Sonatone-
  • Sorrento- Foreign and Domestic Trade Consultants Ltd., Chicago
  • Splendor-
  • St. George- Buegeleisen & Jacobson, George’s Music in New York & Hollywood
  • St. Moritz- Manhattan Novelty Corp., New York City
  • Stadco SoundMaster-  
  • Stafford-
  • Stagemaster-
  • Stairway- UK market
  • Star- Hoshino Gakki brand name
  • Starway-
  • Sterling-
  • Stewart-
  • Stradolin- US, Sorkin Music
  • Solola-
  • Super Astrotone-
  • Surfer-
  • Suzuki- N. American market, Great West Imports Ltd.
  • Swinga-
  • Swinger-
  • Takamine-
  • Tamaki-
  • Teisco-
  • Teisco Del Rey-
  • Telestar- US brand, Telestar Trading Corp. in New York, Maurice Laboz
  • Telstar-
  • Tempest-
  • Tempo- US market, Merson Musical Prod., NY, Matsumoku
  • Thomas-
  • Tix-
  • Tokai-
  • Toledo- CAN market, website
  • Tonemaster-
  • Top Twenty- UK brand
  • Toptone-
  • Toyota-mostly acoustics, hollowbody, Hershman Musical Instrument Co., NY
  • Tremo Twenty-
  • Trump-
  • Truxa-
  • Tulio-
  • Univox- Merson Musical Supply Co., New York, later Unicord
  • Valiant-
  • Ventura- US, distributed by C. Bruno and Co., NY
  • Vernon-
  • Victor- RCA Victor
  • Victoria-
  • Vision-
  • Voice-
  • Vorg-
  • Voxton-
  • Weltron-
  • Westbrook
  • Westbury- Unicord, Westbury New York
  • Westminster- 70s copy era, Pennino Music Co., CA
  • Westone- St. Louis Music Supply Co.
  • Wilson-
  • Winner-
  • Winston- B&G, New York
  • World Teisco-
  • Yamaha-
  • Young Tone-
  • Zenon-
  • Zenta-
  • Zeus-
  • Zim Gar- Gar Zim Musical Instrument Corp., Brooklyn NY, Larry Zimmerman
  • Zombo-

Groceries and Guitars: 1960s Crestwood Japanese Electric Guitar

Oh boy, this one’s a doozy.  Let me tell you something straight off, trying to research guitars like this is truly maddening.  Fun, but mostly maddening.  I’m not sure why I try sometimes, but right now I just can’t help it!  Check this out:

That darn ol’ nameplate right there is a hard one to pin down.  I mean, it clearly says “Crestwood” and it hasn’t fallen off, so what’s the big deal?  Right?  Well, that Crestwood name has appeared all over the place and for some odd reason over the years was really popular, even today.  Just doing a quick search you’ll find at least two versions of the Epiphone Crestwood electric guitar (which is totally unrelated to this guitar and it’s Crestwood name).  Search a little further and you’ll find there are new guitars being made with the Crestwood name (cheap Strat copies and totally unrelated to this guitar).  Search a little more and you’ll probably see a reference to Jack White of the White Stripes and his “1970s era Crestwood Astral II” (MAYBE related, but his is probably from the late 60s).

But you can’t stop there!  Of course, I can’t!  I’ve found violin basses, Les Paul copies (even a gold top!), nylon string acoustics, steel string acoustics, hollow bodies, mandolins, banjos, and fuzz boxes all bearing the Crestwood name!  And you know, I don’t think any TWO of them came out of the same factory in Japan!!  This is the problem with badged imported guitars of the 1960s.  There were so many badges, sold through so many forgotten outlets, bought through so many distributors, shipped through so many importers, that it’s just about impossible to figure out.

Well, at least we know this guitar was made in Japan.  I believe there were at least two or three types of electric guitars bearing the Crestwood badge during the guitar boom of the 1960s.  What I do know is that La Playa Distribution of Detroit imported Crestwood guitars (probably not this one).  There were Crestwood guitars made by Guyatone (not this one), and Crestwood guitars similar to the 1960s Ibanez guitars (not this one), and then there were Kawai made guitars with the Crestwood name (probably this one).  There is even reference to a Milwaukee WI grocery store named Sentry Foods, who had a bakery division named Crestwood in West Allis Wisconsin.  Well, apparently that Crestwood name was also used on guitars and banjos sold right in the grocery store aisles!!!!!!!!  Could you friggin’ imagine?!?!

When I was a kid the local IGA had crummy Funk and Wagnall’s encyclopedias!  And my family somehow missed out on that one book and never even had a complete set! I even remember it was book number 22! Occasionally they had some commemorative plate sets, and maybe some pots and pans as “special” merchandise.  That IGA also had the WORST toys ever!  I didn’t even venture into the “toy” section, and I was a toy FREAK!  BUT I NEVER SAW A GUITAR!!  Geez man, I would’ve NEVER whined to my mom when I had to go grocery shopping!  Now I’m not saying this guitar here was sold out of Sentry foods, but guitars in grocery stores DID HAPPEN!!  And all you people who call the 60s the era of your childhood, and happened to be aspiring guitarists during the 60s, all I can say is YOU LUCKY %$#&!@*@#s!!!!!!

OK, I took a couple deep breaths.  So I really love this guitar.  It plays so nicely and no matter what gauge strings I use, the strings always have this “slinky” feeling and playing this one is really effortless.  The pickups are strong (MIC #1 bridge 4.90K, MIC #2 is 4.99k, MIC #3 is 4.93k, and MIC #4 is 5.07k).  Plus this guitar has the wonderful series wiring so when all pickups are turned on the output is 19.15K!!!!!  This one has a nicely shaped one-peice neck with a working truss rod, a respectable tremolo system, and nicely contoured body, stable tuners, chrome flashiness, and neck binding.  What else could a kid ask for? Dano also gave this one a re-fret and worked out a few kinks in the wiring.  I also put a replacement trem arm on here to round out everything.

I really like these types of neck joints.  They’re typically tight and don’t allow for much side to side movement.  I’ve seen these same neck joints before, and I believe the Domino Baron I had years ago had the same neck joint.  I think that neck joint is telling of the maker, but I can’t say for sure as of yet.

So there you have it kiddies.  Another great little guitar, possibly from a grocery store!  I have seen one other version of this exact guitar.  It was a two-pickup version with a slightly different pick guard, and if I remember correctly the two pickups were at the neck, and not at the bridge.  That was a weird design.  There’s probably one and two and three pickup versions sitting in closets all over the US right now!  Listen to Mike Dugan play mine and maybe you’ll want to crack open that chipboard case!

And I’d love to hear from people regarding where they bought their guitars in the 1960s!